Make Quick Work Of Digging

Make Quick Work Of Digging

The weather’s warming up and it’s time to get out in the garden and do some planting before the summer heat really hits. What is the best way to do this effectively? We’ve put together some hints to help you out. If your digging job is decent (more than simple planting), always Dial Before You Dig. It’s a simple toll free call to 1100. Choose a dry day when the wind is still. It’s easier to dig when it’s not raining, although a bit of moisture is a good thing. Mark out your holes before you start. Get your spacing and measurements right, and mark with string for a straight line. Dump any removed soil onto a tarp or sheet of plywood so it’s easy to backfill. If a hole is unattended for a period of time, cover it with some plywood to prevent somebody injuring themselves, or soil falling back in. Have you heard of the QuikDrill from Fiskars? It’s a seemingly simple tool, but can make a big difference. When you drill soil, it leaves a smooth edged hole without getting stuck on small stones or roots. The tool’s handle is made from FiberComp (which is a fiberglass reinforced polyamide) to make it extremely strong while its steel tube shaft is designed for maximum strength when digging a hole. The efficiency of this tool is created by its dual cutting action with two optimally angled and sharpened blades. It’ll certainly help your back, arms and...
Photography Competition Winners 2018

Photography Competition Winners 2018

Congratulations to our fantastic winners of the Austraflora Photography Competition for 2018! A really wonderful result – 1400 entries, 52 Shortlisted Photos, and finally these amazing 12 Photographs. All of these glorious photos will feature in the Austraflora Calendar 2019 with proceeds going towards Multiple Sclerosis Limited. The details of the prizes can be found in this article: Austraflora Photo Comp Prizes 2018. The biggest thanks to Fiskars, Searles and Seasol. First   Second   Third, Fourth & Fifth “Kingaroy QLD” by Belinda Kranz “Eucalyptus sp.” by Sandy Winkle “Four Mile Hole Billabong NT” by Dianne English Finalists “Polblue Swamp Barrington Tops NSW” by Jason Slade “Banksia spinulosa” by Barry Callister “Grevillea sp.” by Fiona Ford “Swainsona formosa” by Janice Mildwaters “Telopea speciosissima” by Kim Duggan “Craspedia canens” by Nicola Beautyman “Caladenia discoidea” by Irma...
Clever Compost

Clever Compost

How excited were we to use the brand new Seasol Liquid Compost! It has just been released this spring and has completely wowed us! It’s a soil improver which you simply add to a watering can, or there is a hose on pack available. Absolutely no digging at all! Perfect for adding to your lawn, an established garden bed that you don’t wish to disturb or adding to a new garden bed to give your plants the best start. This amazing solution revitalises all soil types – improving structure and soil moisture retention, and encouraging worms and microbes. It can help to break up clay soils and reduce nutrient loss in sandy soils. Seasol Liquid Compost contains seaweed, fish and nutrients to help boost root growth, which will protect and improve the soil – especially after garden bed preparation. It also contains Seasol which will promote strong healthy growth and overall plant health. We decided to treat our display garden beds to it, especially for some of our advanced native plants that are established and mulched. Pictured here is our Atriplex Silver Holly, which really favours well drained sandy soil. It doesn’t perform as well in compacted and waterlogged clays, so is the perfect contender. It was easy to follow the instructions on the back of the bottle, and good to have the option to treat both regular soil and extremely poor soil depending on what the situation is. You continue the treatment every 3-6 months which is simple to keep on top of. The Liquid Compost soaked right in, easy peasy! Next to try was the hose on...
Photography Shortlist 2018

Photography Shortlist 2018

“Phillip Island VIC” by Jason Brown “Omphalotus nidiformis” by Sandy Winkle “Grevillea sp.” by Fiona Ford “Eucalyptus sp.” by Sandy Winkle “Hartz Mountains TAS” by Josh Tagi “Swainsona formosa” by Janice Mildwaters “Chorizema glycinifolium” by Courtney Whitton “Banksia sp.” by Marilyn Edwards “Grevillea sp.” by Fiona Ford “Grevillea armigera” by Gem Cheong “Corymbia ficifolia” by Janice Mildwaters “Telopea speciosissima” by Kim Duggan “Telopea speciosissima” by Eva Fernandes “Kingaroy QLD” by Belinda Kranz “Callistemon sp.” by Sandy Winkle “Maleny QLD” by Belinda Kranz “Eucalyptus rhodantha” by Beth Baker “Sunset in Kakadu NT” by Dianne English “Banksia sphaerocarpa” by Raeline Smith “Boronia mollis” by Fiona Ford “Kiama NSW” by Doug Hewitt “Leura Cascades NSW” by Doug Hewitt “Humidicutis mavis” by Rachel Harper “Grevillea Jelly Baby” by Jo Crosbie “Eucalyptus sp.” by Rebekah Weatherhog “Acacia sp.” by Pam Goble “East Kimberley WA” by Pauline Kirby “Caladenia discoidea” by Irma Ferreira “Ptilotus exaltatus” by Michelle Colbran “Lechenaultia macrantha” by Maria Crisp “Grevillea longistyla x johnsonii” by Ngaire Hart “Galah on Eucalyptus” by Paul Green “Banksia spinulosa” by Lorraine Wilson “Four Mile Hole Billabong NT” by Dianne English “Craspedia canens” by Nicola Beautyman “Polblue Swamp Barrington Tops NSW” by Jason Slade “Grevillea Honey Gem” by Helen Albion “Grevillea bipinnatifida” by Barry Callister “Mycena aff. epipterygia” by Rachel Harper “Eucalyptus sp.” by Sandy Winkle “Melaleuca cheelii” by Fiona Ford “Banksia spinulosa” by Barry Callister “Dipolaena grandiflora” by Beth Baker “Carpobrotus rossii” by Michael Boucher “Wyndham WA” by Pauline Kirby “Grevillea lanigera” by Dianne English “Telopea speciosissima” by Dianne English “Chorizema diversifolium” by Beth Baker “Telopea speciosissima” by Doug Hewitt “Grevillea sp.” by Santa Portolesi “Lake...
Flowering Eucalyptus

Flowering Eucalyptus

A few weeks ago we received a message from one of our followers who was planning on growing a copse of Eucalyptus trees which would flower sequentially. It was a really fun and interesting project to assist with – imagine these beauties rewarding you with flowers all year! Eucalyptus Euky Dwarf was by far the best performer, displaying flowers throughout most of the year. So if you didn’t have lots of space to plant, this would be our #1 choice for blooming time. Below is a PDF for you to print the graph and labels: Eucalyptus...